This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (FONTAGRO). The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (FONTAGRO) announces its 2014 call for proposals, “Innovations for Family Agriculture Adaptation to climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean.” Deadline: May 21, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Research Associate in Agricultural, Environmental and Food Policy with a focus on Governance and Natural Resources. This position is within a newly founded department in the Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences of the Faculty of Natural Sciences within the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Deadline: April 30, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: CIMMYT Poverty and Social Inclusion Specialist. The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center seeks a social scientist to strengthen their core gender and social inclusiveness team within their multidisciplinary research-for-development. Deadline: May 2, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Director, International Land Coalition Secretariat. The International Land Coalition (ILC) is looking to recruit a new Director for the Secretariat of the ILC, to be based in Rome, Italy. Deadline: May 25, 2014

EVENT: International Workshop on Payments for Environmental Services in Public Policies. CIRAD, the Mission Économie de la Biodiversité of the CDC, and their scientific partners are organizing an international workshop on: “Combining Payments for Environmental Services to legal and economic instruments in the South and in the North?”. Deadline: June 1, 2014

PUBLICATION: Conservation Payments under Uncertainty. A forthcoming paper in Land Economics analyzes simulated payments under REDD in Brazil.

PUBLICATION: Exploring local perceptions of climate change. A recent IFPRI Discussion Paper looks at local perceptions of climate change impact and adaptation in rural Bangladesh.

Categories: Forestry News

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (FONTAGRO)

The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology (FONTAGRO) announces its 2014 call for proposals, “Innovations for Family Agriculture Adaptation to climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean.”

This call for proposal 2014 is jointly conducted by FONTAGRO and the "Climate Technology Transfer Mechanisms and Networks in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)" project funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and implemented by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). This project aims at promoting the development and transfer of environmentally appropriate technologies in LAC that contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and vulnerability to climate change in specific sectors.

The call for proposals is aimed at supporting innovation platforms or similar coordination mechanisms that promote competitiveness and sustainability. Platforms are formed by public and private partners which share vision, mission and objectives, and thus facilitate the innovation process in the region.

More information.

Deadline: May 21, 2014

Categories: Forestry News

PUBLICATION: Conservation Payments under Uncertainty

A forthcoming paper in Land Economics:

The decision of whether to retain forest or convert to another land use is affected by uncertainty over future land-use returns. This paper examines the design of conservation payments to landowners under uncertainty. Payments are indexed to the returns from forest conversion (agriculture), or to a market value associated with forest non-use benefits. Payment size depends on the dependency structure between the two competing returns and their relative volatility. In simulating payments for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) in Brazil, low correlation and greater volatility are shown to have opposing effects on landowners’ returns from market-based carbon payments.

Available here.

Categories: Forestry News

PUBLICATION: Exploring local perceptions of climate change

A recent IFPRI Discussion Paper looks at local perceptions of climate change impact and adaptation in rural Bangladesh:

This paper reports on findings from 30 focus group discussions and 30 key informant interviews conducted in 12 districts of Bangladesh in May 2012. The discussions and interviews draw attention to perceptions of climate change and how climate-related trends influence people’s lives, both directly and indirectly. The findings also identify how people adapt to and cope with these changes. This paper aims to improve our understanding of local people’s perceptions of these changes, explore the ways they are affected by them, and how well they are adapting to them. In order for policymakers to plan responses to climate change in Bangladesh, it is essential to understand how people understand and cope with these trends.

The research showed that most respondents had a clear understanding of what was directly affecting their lives and livelihoods in terms of climate trends and the wider environment over the long term. Most respondents were also aware of the usually limited options available to them to adapt to the changes they experience. However, the respondents were less able to understand differences between climate variability and climate change or the causes of the trends they observed.

The respondents reported that adaptation allowed them to cope with declining groundwater levels for agriculture and domestic use, hotter weather, reduced and unpredictable rainfall at key times of the year, more intense extreme weather events such as storms, cyclones, floods, and tornados, and increased salinity of groundwater in coastal areas. Adaptation and coping varied according to location, livelihood, and the assets and endowments people have at their disposal.

Participants were particularly concerned that agricultural productivity is being undermined by increased input costs, increasingly scarce irrigation water, and diminished crop yields. They report changed cropping patterns and that many poorer households formerly supported by agriculture were moving into small, nonagricultural businesses or migrating to urban centers or internationally—mainly in the Middle East—for work.

Households with low incomes and few assets are the most vulnerable. The interviews and focus groups reports of this group showed poorer health due to problems associated with access to clean groundwater and higher temperatures and other unseasonable weather affecting dwellings, trees and crops. Women in low-income households were more concerned than men with accessing clean drinking water, the health of their families, livestock health, and food security. The research provides evidence that some vulnerable people are being excluded as clean water becomes more scarce and costly to extract.

There is a wide range of successful group activity in rural Bangladesh associated with nongovernmental organization microfinance and the management of irrigation. There are opportunities for strengthening group activities to help vulnerable households cope with new climate -related changes, particularly, new crops and cropping patterns, extreme climate events, ensuring access to domestic and agricultural water. Women are particularly vulnerable when households divide or livelihoods change—particularly with migration. Group-based activities are likely to help strengthen women’s position when faced with these circumstances. For the most vulnerable with low incomes and few assets, programs that reduce risk and build up assets will provide more security, particularly in times of crisis.

Full paper Available here.

Categories: Forestry News

IISD input to the LPI<br>e-consultation: Guiding Principles on Large Scale Land Based Investments in Africa

IISD - Wed, 2014-04-23 14:48
This note summarizes IISD’s contribution to the Land Policy Initiative’s e-consultation and draft of guiding principles on large-scale land-based investment in Africa. IISD strongly supports the process as it contributes to building a framework for investment in agriculture in Africa. IISD’s input includes a review of the draft document and various recommendations including suggested wording, references and interpretation of the draft document chapters.
Categories: Forestry News

IISD input to the CFS-RAI<br> e-consultation

IISD - Wed, 2014-04-23 14:46
The note summarizes IISD’s contribution to the CFS’s e-consultation on the zero draft of the principles for responsible agricultural investment (CFS-RAI). IISD participates in the process also through the Civil Society Mechanism, and strongly supports it as a path to creating a normative framework for investment in agriculture. IISD’s contribution to the zero draft includes an analysis and recommendations in the areas related to fostering responsible agricultural investments, and the roles and responsibilities of the relevant stakeholders. In addition, input is provided to establish whether the zero draft achieves the desired outcome to promote investment in agriculture thereby contributing to food security, including the right to adequate food in the context of national food security. Finally, the note provides an analysis of the structure and language used, and recommendations on the next steps in the use and implementation of the CFS-RAI principles by the...
Categories: Forestry News

How to scale out community-based adaptation to climate change

Eldis News - Wed, 2014-04-23 13:13

This working paper explores the ‘scaling out’ of community-based adaptation (CBA) pilots, which is defined as ‘more quality benefits to more people over a wider geographical area, more equitably, more quickly, and more lastingly’. Rather than higher-level policy integration, it focuses on how multiple local actors can pilot small-scale innovations and showcase them until their approaches are replicated by multiple local actors, and a particular technology, practice or local regulatory approach becomes widespread. It identifies several key elements which it argues are common to successful cases of scaling out and explores networks and partnerships, documenting evidence and learning, adaptive capacity and institutional channels and finance mechanisms.

Categories: Forestry News

Registration now open for international conference on large-scale ecosystem restoration and sustainable development

IUCN Feed - Wed, 2014-04-23 00:00

On May 29-30th, 2014, world decision-makers, scientists, practitioners and advocates will meet in Washington, DC, to discuss the potential of large-scale ecosystem restoration to further global development goals and sustainable livelihoods. Registration is now open.

 

Categories: Forestry News

Meeting China’s Global Resource Needs<br>Managing Sustainability Impacts to Ensure Security of Supply: The IISD Supply Risk Tool Methodology

IISD - Tue, 2014-04-22 16:01
China’s large and growing inbound supply chains are among the most direct ways in which China’s rise impacts economies worldwide. For exporting countries this trade brings economic benefits such as employment, income and investment, but can also be associated with social and environmental (or “sustainability”) problems. Negative impacts on land, water, air, biodiversity and communities can translate back into supply chain problems for China, whether through short-term disruptions or the broader impact on China’s “brand” in international markets, which can affect the ability of Chinese enterprises to access international capital, resources, markets and talent.

China’s strategic concerns to address resource scarcity and build an “ecological civilization” make effective management of the social and environmental footprint of inbound supply chains increasingly critical. Sustainability risks therefore should count for...
Categories: Forestry News

Meeting China's Global Resource Needs<br>Managing Sustainability Impacts to Ensure Security of Supply: Palm Oil Pilot Study

IISD - Tue, 2014-04-22 16:01
China’s large and growing inbound supply chains are among the most direct ways in which China’s rise impacts economies worldwide. For exporting countries this trade brings economic benefits such as employment, income and investment, but can also be associated with social and environmental (or “sustainability”) problems. Negative impacts on land, water, air, biodiversity and communities can translate back into supply chain problems for China, whether through short-term disruptions or the broader impact on China’s “brand” in international markets, which can affect the ability of Chinese enterprises to access international capital, resources, markets and talent.

China’s strategic concerns to address resource scarcity and build an “ecological civilization” make effective management of the social and environmental footprint of inbound supply chains increasingly critical. Sustainability risks therefore should count for...
Categories: Forestry News

Meeting China’s Global Resource Needs<br>Managing Sustainability Impacts to Ensure Security of Supply: Copper Pilot Study

IISD - Tue, 2014-04-22 16:00
China’s large and growing inbound supply chains are among the most direct ways in which China’s rise impacts economies worldwide. For exporting countries this trade brings economic benefits such as employment, income and investment, but can also be associated with social and environmental (or “sustainability”) problems. Negative impacts on land, water, air, biodiversity and communities can translate back into supply chain problems for China, whether through short-term disruptions or the broader impact on China’s “brand” in international markets, which can affect the ability of Chinese enterprises to access international capital, resources, markets and talent.

China’s strategic concerns to address resource scarcity and build an “ecological civilization” make effective management of the social and environmental footprint of inbound supply chains increasingly critical. Sustainability risks therefore should count for...
Categories: Forestry News

Meeting China’s Global Resource Needs &<br>Managing Sustainability Impacts to Ensure Security of Supply: Synthesis Report

IISD - Tue, 2014-04-22 15:58
China’s growing inward supply chains provide commodities, goods, technologies and services critical to domestic consumption and to export industries. They are increasingly shaping global markets and local economies for trading partners. This trade brings benefits for exporting countries, but can exacerbate a range of social and environmental and governance problems (collectively labelled “sustainability” issues) such as pollution and climate change, biodiversity loss, and conflict over access to water, land and other natural resources in supplier countries. Key concerns over issues such as “land grabbing,” “conflict minerals” and “the natural resource curse” highlight the complex nature of issues that involve governments, communities and investors across national boundaries, and in areas of poor governance.

It is increasingly recognized that there is a nexus of interactions between such sustainability issues, and exposure to...
Categories: Forestry News

Event to demonstrate local, renewable energy source that also keeps our waterways clean

IISD - Tue, 2014-04-22 14:39
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Event to demonstrate local, renewable energy source that also keeps our waterways clean

WINNIPEG—April 22, 2014—What if there were a way to reduce the amount of harmful nutrients that enter our urban waterways and eventually Lake Winnipeg, and at the same time create a locally-sourced, renewable, organic source of energy? On Wednesday April 23, 2014, at 9:45 a.m. at the Living Prairie Museum, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), in partnership with the City of Winnipeg, will be hosting an event to demonstrate how pellets of cattails and grasses, sourced from Winnipeg, can be burned to generate clean energy and also improve the health of our city’s waterways.

This media-friendly event, in honour of Earth Day on April 22, will showcase a pellet stove that can burn these locally-sourced pellets of cattail and grasses to create clean energy. Guests will be able to see firsthand how the stove works, and learn how...
Categories: Forestry News

Ratio of Man to Trees in City is 6:1, Says KSPCB Sec

India Environment Portal - Tue, 2014-04-22 13:00
Think globally and act locally’ to preserve nature was the message of Earth Day celebrations at RV Teachers’ College here on Tuesday. “Half the problems we face today will be solved if we change our
Categories: Forestry News

New disasters agreement must learn from peace-building and state-building

ODI Environment and Climate Change - Tue, 2014-04-22 00:00
'Disaster risk management often occurs in fragile and conflict-affected states, and efforts to develop a post-2015 global framework for disaster risk management must reflect this reality'
Categories: Forestry News

EMPLOYMENT: Research Associate in Agricultural, Environmental and Food Policy with a focus on Governance and Natural Resources

The Professorship of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Policy with a focus on Governance and Natural Resources is a newly founded department in the Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences of the Faculty of Natural Sciences III within the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg.

We offer a vacancy for a Research Associate (100%). The desired starting date of the candidate is after June 1, 2014. This full-time position is initially for 3 years. A prolongation is foreseen. The salary is based on German federal public service scale according to qualification and tasks up to E13 TV-L.

Tasks:

  • Participation and research in the current research program at the department related to the land-water-energy nexus, sustainable resource use, as well as environmental governance and commons research.
  • Application, administration and organization of third party research proposals and projects.
  • Establishing a new research focus in the frame of the themes covered by the department and related acquisition of funds.
  • Teaching in BSc and MSc classes in related subjects of agricultural, environmental and food policy. Supervision of students.
  • Organizational and administrative tasks of the research group.

Requirements:

  • The preferred candidate has a Master of Science in Agricultural, Political or Environmental Sciences, Resource Economics or related field.
  • PhD with relevance to social-ecological, social-technical or political systems.
  • Background in qualitative and quantitative empirical methods to be applied to institutional analysis, political analysis and/or resource economics.
  • Experience in acquisition of third party funds and the organizational processing of projects is an asset.
  • Experience in international collaborations.
  • Interest to work in interdisciplinary teams.
  • Teaching experience is desired.
  • The candidate should be highly motivated and a team player.
  • Fluent levels of English and German languages are required.

Possibilities for further qualification are offered.

Salary:

The salary will be in accordance with regulations of § 12 ff. German federal public service scale (TV-L) and § 17 TVÜ-L. We specifically encourage qualified female researchers to apply. Preference will be given to disabled persons with equal qualifications.

Information:

For further information, please contact Prof. Dr. Insa Theesfeld, Tel.: 0151 53635407.

Application:

Applicants are requested to submit a full CV including a list of teaching experience and acquisition of third-party funds, list of publications, research concept (possible research themes, research questions and methodological approach) or concrete project ideas that the candidate wants to cover in the next three years (max 3 pages), copies of relevant certificates.

Applications can be sent in German or English, before 30.04.2014 mentioning the reference number 5-2835/14-H to: Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Faculty of Natural Sciences III, Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences, Chair of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Policy, Frau Prof. Dr. Insa Theesfeld, 06099 Halle (Saale). We appreciate if you send your application-package in a single PDF file by e-mail to: itheesfeld@yahoo.de.

This vacancy is under the conditions of possible budgetary restrictions. Travel expenses and daily allowance in relation to the job interview will not be covered.

Deadline: April 30, 2014

Categories: Forestry News

EMPLOYMENT: CIMMYT Poverty and Social Inclusion Specialist

The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, known by its Spanish acronym, CIMMYT, is seeking an experienced, dynamic, innovative, self-motivated, and results-oriented social scientist to strengthen their core gender and social inclusiveness team within their multidisciplinary research-for-development.

The specialist will contribute to and enhance the poverty reduction potential and social inclusiveness of maize and wheat innovations across the developing world. You will work as a member of CIMMYT’s Socio-Economics Program in close collaboration with CIMMYT’s other programs, the WHEAT and MAIZE Consortium Research Programs, and with local and international partners.

The position will be based in Mexico at CIMMYT’s headquarters (located 45 km northeast of Mexico City, Mexico). Frequent travel to rural intervention areas in Africa, Asia and Latin America is required.

Specific duties of this position include:

  • Assess targeted wheat and maize innovations for the poor and marginalized sections of society – including women – to enhance their livelihoods and reduce their vulnerability.

  • Assess modes of mainstreaming social inclusiveness and gender equity into wheat and maize research-for-development in developing countries.

  • Assess intermediate development outcomes and impact pathways of wheat and maize innovations by social strata.

  • Use and develop analytical tools to identify, understand and target options to enhance social inclusiveness and gender equity.

  • Develop a strategic research agenda and priorities to enhance social inclusiveness in maize and wheat research-for-development.

  • Networking, coordination and resource mobilization to establish and strengthen a community of practice around social inclusiveness in CIMMYT and its partners.

  • Publish findings in international peer reviewed journals.

More information.

Deadline: May 2, 2014

Categories: Forestry News

EMPLOYMENT: Director, International Land Coalition Secretariat

The International Land Coalition (ILC) is looking to recruit a new Director for the Secretariat of the ILC, to be based in Rome, Italy.

ILC is a global alliance of 150 civil society and intergovernmental organizations working together to promote secure and equitable access to and control over land for poor women and men through advocacy, dialogue, knowledge sharing and capacity building. . .

ILC members share the common vision that secure and equitable access to and control over land reduces poverty and contributes to identity, dignity, and inclusion. The main governing bodies of the ILC are the Assembly of Members (AoM) and the Coalition Council (CC). . .

The Secretariat of the ILC is hosted by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), one of the ILC members, with headquarters in Rome, Italy. The Secretariat, headed by a Director, is responsible for the execution of the programme of work and budget. It reports to the CC. . .

The Director of the ILC Secretariat is responsible for providing leadership to the CC in establishing the multi-year strategic framework and institutional policies and to manage the operations, programmes, and institutional relationships involved in achieving the mission of the ILC. The Director of the ILC Secretariat has major representational responsibilities and networking roles with senior policy makers at national, regional, and international levels. The Director of the ILC Secretariat reports directly to the CC.

More information.

Deadline: May 25, 2014

Categories: Forestry News

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